Architecture in Britain and Ireland, 1530-1830 (Hardcover)

Architecture in Britain and Ireland, 1530-1830 By Steven Brindle Cover Image

Architecture in Britain and Ireland, 1530-1830 (Hardcover)

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A major new history of architecture in Britain and Ireland that looks at buildings and their construction in detail while revealing the cultural, material, political, and economic contexts that made them
 
Architecture in Britain and Ireland, 1530–1830 presents a comprehensive history of architecture in Britain during this three-hundred-year period. Drawing on the most important advances in architectural history in the last seventy years, ranging across cultural, material, political, and economic contexts, this book also encompasses architecture in Ireland and includes substantial commentary on the buildings of Scotland and Wales. 
 
Across three chronological sections: 1530–1660, 1660–1760, and 1760–1830, this volume explores how architectural culture evolved from a subject carried solely in the minds and skills of craftsmen to being embodied in books and documents and with new professions—architects, surveyors and engineers—in charge. With chapters dedicated to towns and cities, landscape, infrastructure, military architecture, and industrial architecture, and beautifully illustrated with new photography, detailed graphics, and a wealth of historic images, Architecture in Britain and Ireland, 1530–1830 is an invaluable resource for students, historians, and anyone with an interest in the architecture of this period, and promises to become a definitive work of scholarship in the field.
Steven Brindle is senior properties historian at English Heritage and publishes widely on the history of architecture and engineering, with major works including Brunel: The Man Who Built the World and, as editor, Windsor Castle: A Thousand Years of a Royal Palace.
“Like J M Richards all those decades ago, I can confidently predict that this will be the standard textbook for many years to come.”—William Whyte, Literary Review